Thank you for your interest in applying for a Poetry Apprenticeship scholarship! We welcome all to apply for this opportunity. Please use the form below to complete the application. If you have questions or if this virtual form is a barrier for you, please contact Emma Saks, program associate, at 612-215-2587 or esaks@loft.org for assistance. 


The Loft is committed to equity in our programming by creating opportunities for folks who face barriers to participation in artistic career development. We encourage individuals from historically marginalized communities to apply, including, but not limited to, Black and Indigenous people and people of color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA+ individuals, low-income individuals, and people with disabilities. 


We anticipate far more applications from highly qualified candidates than we can possibly accept. Please know our scholarship committee reads every application we receive and evaluates them holistically based five central factors (in no particular order):

1. Demonstrated interest in the art and craft of writing.

What experience do you have with writing? How have you demonstrated a commitment to the craft, whether professionally or personally?

2. Desire for resources and community.

What other resources or opportunities have you had (or not had) access to? Why do you seek the community a small, intensive cohort provides?

3. Writing project fit.

What is your current project and how developed is it?

4. Expressed need for financial support.

Please describe what factors impact your need for financial assistance. Are you enrolled in a public assistance program, such as TANF; MFIP; General Assistance; WIC; Medicaid, Medical Assistance, or Minnesota Care; SSI (disability, not retirement); food stamps; Section 8 Housing? If not, what factors impact your need for financial assistance to take a Loft class?

5. Experienced barriers to participation in artistic career development

The Loft understands that financial barriers are not the only barriers to participation in writing development opportunities. Have other factors impacted your ability to participate in similar programs? Do you identify as part of a historically marginalized community?


The Loft's Poetry Apprenticeship is a rigorous and intensive year-long apprenticeship dedicated to helping you complete your poetry collection. Applicants are required to read about the details of the program on the Loft's website (https://loft.org/services/year-long-writing-projects), to make sure they understand the rigor and time commitment required to be successful, before applying.


The Loft's scholarship for the Poetry Apprenticeship will significantly reduce the cost to participate in this intensive creative program. Instead of paying full tuition ($7,000), the scholarship recipient will pay a down payment of $25, due at the time of acceptance of the scholarship and upon registration, and will pay $20 monthly for 12 months, paying a total of $265 in tuition for this year-long apprenticeship. There are additional costs associated with this program, such as books, copy fees, transportation, etc., that are not covered by the scholarship. A credit or debit card with an expiration date AFTER December 30, 2022, is required; if this presents a barrier for the recipient, the payment plan, though not the payment amount, can be modified.


The 2022 Poetry Apprenticeship will offer only an online cohort; in-person meetings are not possible. Please note the Loft cannot provide computers or WiFi access for students. There is no scholarship application fee.


The application period is open until Sunday, October 3rd at 11:59 PM (Central Time Zone); scholarship applicants will be notified after October 25 and no later than November 10 of scholarship award status. One scholarship will be awarded per Year-Long Writing Project section (i.e., one for Novel, one for Memoir, one for Poetry Apprenticeship).



*****


The James Bettendorf Memorial Commentary

James (Jim) Bettendorf was a beloved member of the Foreword Poetry Group, a poetry sharing

gathering of eleven poets that grew out of the Loft’s two-year “Master Track Apprentice

Program” designed to help poets assemble a first full-length manuscript. Jim joined the Loft in

2006 and was one of the inaugural students in the program which began in 2007. His mentor in

the program was Loft teacher and fellow poet, Thomas R. Smith. In 2014 Jim published a book

of poems called Swimming in the Earth with art by his daughter Suzanne Bettendorf and

published by Cup and Spiral Books. As Smith noted on the book’s back cover, “Jim’s poems

preserve the mystery of the dream, resisting the urge to interpret, while making its meaning

intuitively clear to readers.”

Jim began to focus more seriously on poetry after he retired in 2001 from a long career as a math

teacher at North High School in St. Cloud, Minnesota. His observation skills were well honed,

and he offered his fellow Foreword Poetry Group members much valued feedback, always

punctuating any comments with “Yes!” when he left a note on another group participant's poem.

Sadly, Jim passed way in February of 2021, but we know he would say “Yes!” to this new year-

long program offered [to] poets and other writers through the Loft. The Foreword Poetry Group

is pleased to dedicate, in Jim’s name, a partial off-set of the scholarship costs for one worthy

poet in the coming year. We, his poetry group friends, are so proud to have raised a memorial

fund for this purpose. And we all offer, as Jim would [have done], our own “Yes!” to the

recipient of this scholarship.  May poetic inspiration abound.

  

Thank you for your interest in applying for a Novel Writing Project scholarship! We welcome all to apply for this opportunity. Please use the form below to complete the application. If you have questions or if this virtual form is a barrier for you, please contact Emma Saks, program associate, at 612-215-2587 or esaks@loft.org for assistance.


The Loft is committed to equity in our programming by creating opportunities for folks who face barriers to participation in artistic career development. We encourage individuals from historically marginalized communities to apply, including, but not limited to, Black and Indigenous people and people of color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA+ individuals, low-income individuals, and people with disabilities.


We anticipate far more applications from highly qualified candidates than we can possibly accept. Please know our scholarship committee reads every application we receive and evaluates them holistically based five central factors (in no particular order):

1. Demonstrated interest in the art and craft of writing.

What experience do you have with writing? How have you demonstrated a commitment to the craft, whether professionally or personally?

2. Desire for resources and community.

What other resources or opportunities have you had (or not had) access to? Why do you seek the community a small, intensive cohort provides?

3. Writing project fit.

What is your current project and how developed is it?

4. Expressed need for financial support.

Please describe what factors impact your need for financial assistance. Are you enrolled in a public assistance program, such as TANF; MFIP; General Assistance; WIC; Medicaid, Medical Assistance, or Minnesota Care; SSI (disability, not retirement); food stamps; Section 8 Housing? If not, what factors impact your need for financial assistance to take a Loft class?

5. Experienced barriers to participation in artistic career development

The Loft understands that financial barriers are not the only barriers to participation in writing development opportunities. Have other factors impacted your ability to participate in similar programs? Do you identify as part of a historically marginalized community?


The Loft's Novel Writing Project is a rigorous and intensive year-long program dedicated to helping you complete your novel. Applicants are required to read about the details of the program on the Loft's website (https://loft.org/services/year-long-writing-projects), to make sure they understand the rigor and time commitment required to be successful, before applying.


The Loft's scholarship for the Novel Writing Project will significantly reduce the cost to participate in this intensive creative program. Instead of paying full tuition ($7,000), the scholarship recipient will pay a down payment of $25, due at the time of acceptance of the scholarship and upon registration, and will pay $20 monthly for 12 months, paying a total of $265 in tuition for this year-long project. There are additional costs associated with this program, such as books, copy fees, transportation, etc., that are not covered by the scholarship. A credit or debit card with an expiration date AFTER December 30, 2022, is required; if this presents a barrier for the recipient, the payment plan, though not the payment amount, can be modified.


The 2022 Novel Writing Project will offer an in-person and online cohort. The in-person cohort will meet at Open Book, in a Loft classroom, beginning in February; if issues arise beyond the Loft’s control that makes this impossible (as they did in 2020 and 2021 with the global pandemic), meetings will take place online via Zoom. The online cohort will meet via live weekly video meetings over Zoom. Please note the Loft cannot provide computers or WiFi access for students. Scholarship recipients will choose to apply their scholarship to the in-person OR online cohort. There is no scholarship application fee.


The application period is open until Sunday, October 3rd at 11:59 PM (Central Time Zone); scholarship applicants will be notified after October 25 and no later than November 10 of scholarship award status. One scholarship will be awarded per Year-Long Writing Project section (i.e., one for Novel, one for Memoir, one for Poetry Apprenticeship).
 

Thank you for your interest in applying for a Creative Nonfiction/Memoir Writing Project scholarship! We welcome all to apply for this opportunity. Please use the form below to complete the application. If you have questions or if this virtual form is a barrier for you, please contact Emma Saks, program associate, at 612-215-2587 or esaks@loft.org for assistance.


The Loft is committed to equity in our programming by creating opportunities for folks who face barriers to participation in artistic career development. We encourage individuals from historically marginalized communities to apply, including, but not limited to, Black and Indigenous people and people of color (BIPOC), LGBTQIA+ individuals, low-income individuals, and people with disabilities.

We anticipate far more applications from highly qualified candidates than we can possibly accept. Please know our scholarship committee reads every application we receive and evaluates them holistically based five central factors (in no particular order):

1. Demonstrated interest in the art and craft of writing.

What experience do you have with writing? How have you demonstrated a commitment to the craft, whether professionally or personally?

2. Desire for resources and community.

What other resources or opportunities have you had (or not had) access to? Why do you seek the community a small, intensive cohort provides?

3. Writing project fit.

What is your current project and how developed is it?

4. Expressed need for financial support.

Please describe what factors impact your need for financial assistance. Are you enrolled in a public assistance program, such as TANF; MFIP; General Assistance; WIC; Medicaid, Medical Assistance, or Minnesota Care; SSI (disability, not retirement); food stamps; Section 8 Housing? If not, what factors impact your need for financial assistance to take a Loft class?

5. Experienced barriers to participation in artistic career development

The Loft understands that financial barriers are not the only barriers to participation in writing development opportunities. Have other factors impacted your ability to participate in similar programs? Do you identify as part of a historically marginalized community?


The Loft's Creative Nonfiction/Memoir Writing Project is a rigorous and intensive year-long program dedicated to helping you complete your creative nonfiction project. Applicants are required to read about the details of the program on the Loft's website (https://loft.org/services/year-long-writing-projects), to make sure they understand the rigor and time commitment required to be successful, before applying.


The Loft's scholarship for the Creative Nonfiction/Memoir Writing Project Project will significantly reduce the cost to participate in this intensive creative program. Instead of paying full tuition ($7,000), the scholarship recipient will pay a down payment of $25, due at the time of acceptance of the scholarship and upon registration, and will pay $20 monthly for 12 months, paying a total of $265 in tuition for this year-long project. There are additional costs associated with this program, such as books, copy fees, transportation, etc., that are not covered by the scholarship. A credit or debit card with an expiration date AFTER December 30, 2022, is required; if this presents a barrier for the recipient, the payment plan, though not the payment amount, can be modified.

The 2022 Creative Nonfiction/Memoir Writing Project will offer an in-person and online cohort. The in-person cohort will meet at Open Book, in a Loft classroom, beginning in February; if issues arise beyond the Loft’s control that makes this impossible (as they did in 2020 and 2021 with the global pandemic), meetings will take place online via Zoom. The online cohort will meet via live weekly video meetings over Zoom. Please note the Loft cannot provide computers or WiFi access for students. Scholarship recipients will choose to apply their scholarship to the in-person OR online cohort. There is no scholarship application fee.

The application period is open until Sunday, October 3rd at 11:59 PM (Central Time Zone); scholarship applicants will be notified after October 25 and no later than November 10 of scholarship award status. One scholarship will be awarded per Year-Long Writing Project section (i.e., one for Novel, one for Memoir, one for Poetry Apprenticeship).
 

The Loft plans to begin offering in-person classes at Open Book beginning January, 2022. We will also continue to offer online classes throughout the term, both Online/Live (via Zoom, and Google Classroom as a learning enhancement if you choose) and Online/Asynchronous (WetInk, no live meetings). Please choose which format you're proposing for the class proposal you're submitting. 

Please also understand that if you choose to propose an in-person class and it is accepted, safety protocols surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic may mean quick adaptations are necessary, either in the classroom, or by moving in-person content to a virtual format. Even if the class is already underway flexibility and adaptability are important and necessary as we continue to navigate programming through this pandemic.

The Loft will follow all CDC guidelines and safety protocols to keep students, teaching contractors, and staff safe in Open Book classrooms, including lowering classroom capacity rates (10 students max versus 17 or 30 for multi week or single session classes, respectively) and scheduling fewer in-person classes that usual (2-3 max, versus 5-6 in a given time frame), so we utilize only the largest classrooms with fewer people for social distancing.

Any statements in this form about COVID-19 safety protocols, such as class size maximums, the ability to teach in-person at Open Book, etc, is subject to change as guidelines and recommendations evolve. Please be patient and flexible with us as we try to plan for the future with evolving conditions.

Pease note the smaller class size does affect teacher pay rate, since the Loft model of teacher pay is on a per student, per contact hour basis. You can read more about compensation under the Terms of Agreement section below, to decide if teaching in-person with a smaller class size makes sense for you at this time. If it doesn't, please propose a class in one of our online formats.

If there are questions or concerns about this, please contact the Loft's education director at jdodgson@loft.org.

Please familiarize yourself with The Loft's Teacher's Guide if you are a new teaching applicant, always available at loft.org; it's a comprehensive guide to getting many of your questions answered, including questions about compensation, our class cancellation policy, and much more. Please note it is a living document and is always a work in progress. Some of what is outlined in it is also stated below under "Terms of Agreement."

The Loft will deliver classes in three formats

In-Person class meetings at the Loft/Open Book. Classes will meet at Open Book, in one of the larger Loft classrooms, in downtown Minneapolis. 

Real-Time/Live Meetings are the most similar to face-to-face classes. Classes meet live via Zoom and a scheduled time. Teachers of these classes may also use a Google Classroom to make materials available to students, especially for multiweek classes.
Flex Classes/No Live Meetings are a good option for teachers with variable schedules, and are perfect for students with unusual/variable schedules and/or unreliable Internet access. These classes take place on the Wet.Ink platform. Classes run week to week but students can sign in any time during the week to participate in message-board style discussions, read lectures, respond to writing prompts, etc. Because Wet.Ink is optimized for creative writing classes with tools to annotate and comment on documents, it is also a great choice for any classes with an extensive feedback or workshop component. These classes should have no scheduled live meetings with the entire class.

For this round of proposals we will ask you to pick ONE format for your class you think works best for you and the content of the class. 


In order to teach online, Loft teaching artists must have a reliable and high speed internet connection and a computer, as well as basic knowledge of computer use, Zoom and Google Classroom, or WetInk. The Loft can not provide you with a computer or internet access. The Loft CAN provide you with limited training on Zoom, Google Classroom, and WetInk, mostly in the form of self training through linked videos and readings; please email the education director for more information at jdodgson@loft.org.

 
What We're Looking For

A diverse group of teaching writers from all walks of life, who provide many different perspectives on approaches to teaching craft, the writing life, the (self- or traditional) publishing experience, etc. There are no required degrees or publishing credentials to teach at the Loft, just an active writing life and a desire to share your unique knowledge and experience with a curious student community. Please note, we do tend to prioritize teaching experience and some publishing credentials in those who want to propose "intermediate" or "advanced" classes in creative writing; in these offerings, students are often seeking the expertise of writers who have experience and accomplishment in these areas.
Diverse and inclusive reading lists and approaches to teaching craft. Proposals that include the names of 2-4 writers or a book/book excerpts likely to be read or studied as examples of strong writing craft are considered stronger proposals than those without. They must be from a diverse perspective - representation matters.

A strong, considered statement on how your class plan and teaching strategies will align with the Loft’s goal to be equitable, inclusive, and anti-racist in its classrooms and with its programming. If you need time to understand what the Loft means by this, or are simply curious for more information, here are some suggested resources—especially if you need help leading and navigating classroom discussions of student work as they relate to these topics:


Books
How to Be An Anti-Racist by Ibram X. Kendi
A Good Time for the Truth, edited by Sun Yung Shin
Craft in the Real World by Matthew Salesses
Anti-Racism Writing Workshop: How to Decolonize the Creative Classroom by Felicia Rose Chavez
Appropriate: A Provocation by Paisley Rekdal


Online Learning Resources:
For an idea of how the Loft continues to build knowledge and capacity on this, please visit Team Dynamics.com and IDIInventory.com
National SEED Project (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity)
ASDICircle.org
These are just a few of the many resources available on creating an inclusive learning environment in your classroom; if you are unsure of how to do this, or don't understand how to articulate how your lesson plan and teaching strategies will create this kind of environment in your classroom, feel free to connect with the Loft's education director before you propose your class (jdodgson@loft.org).

Classes that are responsive to current events. The Loft has become a resource for people looking to navigate life online, from ways to increase proficiency in writing for an online audience, to ways to better navigate our new way of living and connecting virtually (writing for self care, journaling through hard times, creating community online). Classes designed to teach new job skills through creative writing are also in high demand (Copywriting 101, Editing 101, Descriptive Language, Communicate Effectively in Writing, etc ), as well as learning software or digital platforms used by writers (Scrivener, WetInk, etc).

Please don't forget, people still want to learn poetry, write their novel, and start their memoir, so classes on writing craft are still essential!

We are not an academic institution; there are no grades, tests, required reading, or papers required to complete a class. "Homework" is always optional.

Multiweek classes for writers in any genre or at any level. We are always looking for creative writing classes for adults in all genres and for all levels. Our students have a range of skill levels, commitment, and interests. We hope any writer looking in our catalog will find the class that's perfect for them. Be prepared to teach students with disparate skill sets and levels, interests, and abilities in a single class.

More advanced level classes are always needed; prior teaching experience and a record of professional accomplishment in the genre you'd like to teach are typically preferred for advanced classes.
12 week classes (for fall and winter/spring only, there are no 12 week classes in summer) with instruction on craft, engaging class discussion, in-class writing opportunities, and sharing of work with option for feedback, and clear goals and outcomes.
Strong and flexible lesson plans. Loft classes give writers opportunities to engage with their teaching artist and one another, while also providing content, instruction, engaging discussion, and in-class writing activities, as well as writing prompts students can work on between class meetings.
Sequential learning opportunities in all genres ("Introduction to...." that progresses to "Intermediate" and then "Advanced" term after term). This of course requires a commitment to come back and teach beyond just a single term. Please email the education program director at jdodgson@loft.org with questions.
Advanced classes, especially in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction/memoir. (Again, please remember we also need beginning level classes, as well as those that are Open to All, so don't shy away from proposing those, as well as single sessions!).
Classes for Readers - these classes encourage critical thinking and civil discourse by placing great books at the center of each meeting. For Readers classes can focus on one book or a few, and they can incorporate writing practice or not. Please consider local, national, and global events currently affecting our community, and think about books that might address questions, themes, and social issues people are grappling with NOW. Books can be fiction, nonfiction, poetry, or a combination.


Thematic Classes. The theme for winter/spring term 2022 is: 

Know Your Place (!)?:
A simple pin on a map can seem like a benign concept, but the idea of place complicates beyond location and relates to a spectrum of belonging and othering. You can have your place at the table (or not), compete for a place, lose your place, be put in your place, told to know your place, and even have a place all your own. This season the Loft will explore how we all negotiate the customs, rules, exceptions, connections, and relationships through the lens of place.

What we are not looking for We have not had success with classes that feel academic in nature (e.g., assigning academic writing texts, reading lists that are too long, reading classes built around classics) or are too niche (e.g., somatic writing, writing in translation). Please get to know our catalog and current offerings to see what we do. Again, reading lists should include recent works and diverse authors; reading lists should also be fairly brief. The Loft offers community based enrichment education, we are not an academic institution.


TERMS OF AGREEMENT
By continuing with this application you are indicating agreement with the following terms and code of conduct.
Teaching Artists are Independent Contractors As an independent contractor, please note that the Loft does not make deductions from your compensation for taxes. We’ll provide you with IRS Form 1099 at the beginning of each calendar year. You’ll need to indemnify the Loft against adverse rulings by any taxing authority as a result of the consulting contract or in the event that you fail to qualify as an independent contractor for tax purposes.
Compensation You’ll be paid $6.50 per student per contact hour based on enrollment for your second class meeting (students may drop the class during the first week). This pay rate is for all formats: In-person, Online/Live Meeting (Zoom), and Online/Asynchronous (WetInk). For example, if you are teaching a 6-week class (meeting 2 hours per week for 6 weeks) with an enrollment of 14 students, your compensation will be $1,092. Tuition alone does not cover the cost of the Loft’s sliding-fee classes, which are made possible, in part, through grants and individual donations. Please consider becoming a member of the Loft (membership is not required to teach at the Loft). 

Those teaching a class for readers, which are more discussion based, facilitated book clubs, with no writing instruction involved, will be paid a flat rate of $50 per hour, regardless of the number of students enrolled. Minimums remain 7, maximums remain 12-17 (but 8 for an in-person class for winter/spring 2022), depending on the max choice of the teaching artist. 

For all classes, there is a possibility your class could be cancelled, and no payment received, if class does not meet minimum enrollment numbers approximately 3-5 days before the start date. Please be active partners with us in marketing and promoting your classes across all possible channels!
Multi-week classes have a minimum enrollment requirement of 7 students, a maximum of 17 (for winter/spring 2022, we will lower the maximum allowed per in-person class to 8). Single and double session classes have minimum enrollment requirements of 7 students, maximum of 30 (for in-person single session classes, we will lower the maximum to 8). If you feel your class warrants different minimum/maximum enrollment requirements, please indicate this in the proposal form AND email the education director at jdodgson@loft.org.

Please be prompt in all communication, whether responding to Loft staff, or connecting with students.
Please ensure you have access to all required technology needed in order to teach well before your class meets, from a reliable internet connection, a working computer, and appropriate software platforms available (Zoom, WetInk) ready to go.
Please review all communication and technical training information sent by Loft staff well before your class is set to begin. Doing so the night before is often a recipe for disaster - or at least ill preparedness.
Teaching Artist Supervision and Performance Review As an independent contractor, you truly are working independently within the parameters of your teaching contract. Our main performance review tool is student evaluations, which we also send to you. It’s a good idea to survey your students mid-way through the class in order to build upon what students feel are the most helpful elements of the class, and to proactively address any concerns students may raise. If you’re teaching at the Loft for the first time, a member of the Education Team may attend your first class meeting to provide assistance, support, and encouragement.
Class Texts, Handouts, and Copy Fees Required texts for online classes should be readily available online, in bookstores, and/or in libraries. College textbooks are often too expensive for Loft students and not a good fit for enrichment classes. When you select texts, please keep in mind that some students may have limited time available for readings and assignments outside the classroom. Often Teaching Artists prefer hand-outs to books. Copy fees for hand-outs are not included in tuition; students pay you directly during class. Please be sure to bring enough hand-outs for your students. Emergency copies may be made at the Loft for .10 cents per copy. You may not require students to purchase books you have written unless your book is an instructional text on the content you’ll be teaching. Feel free to use your own work to illustrate a lesson, but please do not use class time to promote sales of your books, and don’t sell your books to students during class.
Controlled Substances Alcohol and other mood-altering drugs are prohibited while directly engaging with students, with the exception of medically prescribed or over-the-counter drugs.
Class Cancellation Due to Low Enrollment If five or six students are enrolled, you may choose to teach the class (please be aware that enrollment may further drop prior to your second class meeting). If fewer than five students are enrolled, the class is canceled, typically 3-5 business days before the first scheduled class meeting. Classes with seven or more students are considered viable.
Class Cancellation Due to Weather The Loft follows the University of Minnesota’s lead on class cancellations due to weather. If concerned, please call us at 612-379-8999. We’ll announce cancellations via an email, on our website, and on our phone line. (Note that this is our usual policy and does not pertain to this term unless severe weather results in widespread power and Internet loss).
Class Cancellation by Teaching Artist Please contact us if you will miss a class due to illness or emergency. We’ll inform your students and work with you to schedule a make-up class. Please do not arrange for a substitute to teach your class without prior approval from Loft staff. If you cancel a scheduled class you have agreed to teach or fail to show up for your class, you will ineligible to teach at the Loft in the future.
Criminal Background Check The Loft Literary Center is required by its policies and its insurance carrier to conduct a criminal background check on anyone who will work, in any capacity, with minors. Teaching artists who refuse the criminal background check will not be eligible to teach classes for children and/or teens.
Promotion of Non-Loft Programs and Services Many Teaching Artists also offer private services, and many teach at other organizations. We’re happy to include your website address in your Teaching Artist bio. Feel free to respond to student inquiries about your services and other classes, but please do not use class time to promote your services, books, or classes you teach at other organizations.
Code of Conduct The Loft has revised and expanded their code of conduct, especially around sexual harassment. Please see the complete document here. https://loft.amm.clockwork.net/_asset/f22zpb/Loft-Code-of-Conduct-March-2018.pdf 

McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers, $25,000 Loft Awards in Poetry, Spoken Word, and in Children’s Literature/Younger Children

DEADLINE: 11:59 p.m. CT Friday, November 19, 2021. Entries must be submitted through our online portal Submittable by 11:59 p.m. CT. The Loft offices—including virtual office hours— are closed at 5 p.m. CT that day, so please plan accordingly.

The Loft Literary Center is pleased to announce the 2022 McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers, made possible by the generous support of the McKnight Foundation. McKnight also funds artist fellowship programs in ceramic arts, choreography and dance, music composition, music performance, playwriting and theater arts, screenwriting, and visual arts.

ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

The McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers provide Minnesota writers of demonstrated ability with an opportunity to work on their craft for a concentrated period of time.

One $25,000 fellowship is awarded each year in children’s literature, including poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. This year’s award is offered to a writer for children eight8 years of age or younger.

Four $25,000 fellowships are offered in alternating years to writers of creative prose and poetry. The 2022 year cycle is in poetry and spoken word.  

There will be three awards for poetry and one for spoken word. The spoken word fellowship will be judged by its own separate accomplished, nationally recognized spoken word artist.

In addition to the award money, McKnight Fellows are also entitled to up to $3,000 in reimbursement to attend a writing conference or retreat during their fellowship year. These fellowships do not support the work of playwriting, journalism, or nonfiction that is written primarily for educational or technical use. The Spoken Word Fellow will have the opportunity to work with our partners at IFP to create a short spoken word video.

JUDGING FOR THE MCKNIGHT ARTIST FELLOWSHIPS FOR WRITERS

Prominent writers and editors living outside of Minnesota serve as the judges. There are no screening judges. All manuscripts are judged anonymously.

Due to the number of entries received, it is not possible for the judges to make individual comments on the manuscripts.

ELIGIBILITY

General Requirements

Applicants must have been legal residents of Minnesota for the 12 months prior to the application deadline and must currently reside in Minnesota.

Applicants may apply for only one McKnight Artist Fellowship per year. You may not apply for the Award in Poetry and also apply for any other McKnight Fellowship, including the Award in Children’s Literature and the Award for Spoken Word.

Recipients of 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, or 2021 McKnight Fellowships in any discipline are not eligible to apply. Honorable mentions are eligible.

Loft and McKnight Foundation staff and board members are not eligible.

If you have questions about your eligibility for the McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers, please email Bao Phi, Director of Events and Awards, at bphi@loft.org.

Additional Requirements for the Awards in Poetry

In addition to the general eligibility requirements, applicants must have either:

Published at least 12 original poems in no fewer than three3 literary journals or magazines that regularly feature poetry as part of their format. (Work published in an online journal that has an editorial process is eligible.)

or
Published at least one book-length collection of poetry.

Work that is scheduled for publication/production between the contest deadline and April 2022 may be included. In those cases, a letter from the press, editor, producer, community organizer, or curator stating the date of publication, release, or performance is required.

Additional Requirements for the Award in Spoken Word

In addition to the general eligibility requirements, applicants must have:

Published at least 12 original poems in no fewer than three3 literary journals or magazines that regularly feature poetry as part of their format. (Work published in an online journal that has an editorial process is eligible.)

or

Published at least one book-length collection of poetry

or

Produced a full-length spoken word CD

or

Produced a one person show with a presenting organization—the show must have been written by the applicant.

or

Written and performed spoken word/performance work, in contracted arrangements, for a minimum of three years, and with a minimum of eight performances with a minimum time slot of 15 minutes per performance. The three years do not have to be consecutive.

Work that is scheduled for publication/production between the contest deadline and April 2022 may be included. In those cases, a letter from the press, editor, producer, community organizer, or curator stating the date of publication, release, or performance is required.

Additional Requirements for the Award in Children’s Literature: Younger Children

In addition to the general eligibility requirements, applicants must have:

Published a book for children under the age of eight, in any genre other than educational textbook material

or
Published at least three pieces of original work in one or more publications that regularly feature creative work for children under the age of eight as part of their format. Work published in an online journal that has an editorial process is eligible. Work published in an anthology is eligible. The same piece printed in a journal and in an anthology may only be counted once; applicants may not use multiple publications of the same work to meet the three required pieces.

Work that is pending publication and will be published before April 1, 2022 is eligible. Please provide a letter from the editor or publisher with proof of publication.

Ineligible work in all three awards:

  • Student-only publications and self-published books.
  • Work published on personal home pages or online sites that do not have an editorial process.
  • Work in a genre outside the category in which you are applying. (e.g., creative prose may not be used to meet the publication requirements for the Award in Poetry).
  • A feature performance at a venue where the lineup is curated by the applicant.
  • Work that has previously won a McKnight Artist Fellowships for Writers. If you are a previous winner, you must submit a manuscript different from the one for which you received the earlier award.
  • Translations.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Please prepare your writing/performance sample. All work samples must be anonymous. If your name appears as part of the manuscript text, omit it, use a pseudonym, or black it out so it is illegible. Do not include your name as part of the writing sample file name. Identifying information should only be included in the Submittable application form, which is blind to the judge. Identifying information anywhere in the submitted files will disqualify your submission.

You must apply through Submittable, and you will need to create a Submittable account if you do not already have one. If you have technical submission questions, please contact Submittable technical support at http://help.submittable.com/.

WORK SAMPLE

Loft Awards in Poetry: Applicants must submit at least 15 but no more than 18 pages of a poetry manuscript (12-point font). Do not put more than one poem or one column of poetry per page. If you are submitting an audio recording of spoken word poetry, you must ALSO include a written transcript in a document.

PROOF OF PUBLICATION
Applicants will need to provide proof of each publication necessary to meet eligibility. For books, we will need a photocopy or scanned image of the title and copyright pages. For journals, we will need photocopies or scanned documents of either the cover or title page of the journal as well as the table of contents page and the pages on which your work appears.

PROOF OF RESIDENCY
In your eligibility documentation document, please also include a photocopy or scan of your MN state ID or a copy of a utilities bill with your name and address. Failure to provide any of this eligibility proof will disqualify your application.

Work samples may be submitted as PDF, DOC, or DOCX. Audio files may be submitted as MP3 or WAV files.

Loft Awards in Spoken Word: Applicants must submit at least 15 but no more than 18 pages of a poetry manuscript (12-point font). Do not put more than one poem or one column of poetry per page. Applicants may also submit 8–10 minutes of audio recorded poetry. If you are submitting an audio recording of spoken word poetry, you must ALSO include a written transcript in a document.

PROOF OF PUBLICATION
Applicants will need to provide proof of each publication necessary to meet eligibility. For books, we will need a photocopy or scanned image of the title and copyright pages. For journals, we will need photocopies or scanned documents of either the cover or title page of the journal as well as the table of contents page and the pages on which your work appears. For audio publications, a scan of the album cover. For proof of a one person show, please provide a scan of the program for the event or a short letter from the producer or presenting organization. For proof of being a feature performer, please provide a simple list stating the performance venue and name, and month/date/time of the feature performances— - you need only provide enough proof of performances to meet the eligibility requirement. Please collect all of these files into a single document for upload (PDF, DOC, or DOCX).

PROOF OF RESIDENCY
In your eligibility documentation document, please also include a photocopy or scan of your MN state ID or a copy of a utilities bill with your name and address. Failure to provide any of this eligibility proof will disqualify your application.

Loft Award in Children’s Literature: Applicants must submit a manuscript that is at least five5 but no more than 20 pages in length and that is written for children under the age of eight8. Picture book applicants may submit more than one manuscript to reach five pages.

Manuscripts may be in prose or poetry, or a combination of the two. Prose manuscripts should be double-spaced. Poetry may be single- or double-spaced.

All manuscripts must be typed in a 12-point font.

PROOF OF PUBLICATION
Applicants will need to provide proof of each publication necessary to meet eligibility. For books, we will need a photocopy or scanned image of the title and copyright pages. For journals, we will need photocopies or scanned documents of either the cover or title page of the journal as well as the table of contents page and the pages on which your work appears. Please collect all of these files into a single document for upload (PDF, DOC, or DOCX).

PROOF OF RESIDENCY
In your eligibility documentation document, please also include a photocopy or scan of your MN state ID or a copy of a utilities bill with your name and address. Failure to provide any of this eligibility proof will disqualify your application.

Work samples may be submitted as PDF, DOC, or DOCX files.

Deadline: All applications must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. CT on November 19, 2021. No exceptions. The Loft offices—including virtual office hours— close at 5 p.m. CT. Plan ahead and give yourself extra time. We cannot accommodate late entries due to internet difficulty. If you have questions, please contact Director of Events and Awards Bao Phi at bphi@loft.org and book an appointment or conversation at least one week in advance. Anyone waiting until the last week of the deadline may not be accommodated depending on scheduling.

Notification: Entrants will be notified of their status by the end of April, 2022. Winners will begin receiving payments in May, 2022.

The Loft Literary Center